The Hayward Hotel, southwest corner of Sixth and Spring Streets, c. 1910-2010

c. 1910-2010

Completed in 1906, the Hayward Hotel was one of Los Angeles’ earliest highrises, and one of its first major structures to be built with reinforced concrete. The Hayward was highly successful in its early years, owing to its prime location a stone’s throw from the city’s growing business center. In 1916, a one-story addition was built on top of the existing building, and ground broke the following year on a seven-story addition facing Spring Street (photo left). The Hayward completed its final major expansion in 1926 with the opening of an adjacent fourteen-story tower on Sixth Street.

The Hayward was converted into apartment residences sometime after the Second World War. In 2008, Pacific Investments embarked upon an extensive renovation of the Hayward’s facade and storefronts, which was closely followed by blogdowntown.

Sources:
1. “To make more room at top.” Los Angeles Times. 16 Sep. 1916. p. 6.
2. “Big hotel for south Spring.” Los Angeles Times. 16 Dec. 1917. p. 6.
3. “Hayward Hotel plans addition on Sixth Street.” Los Angeles Times. 29 Mar. 1925. p. F1.
Original photo: “chs-m1275.” c. 1910. Title Insurance and Trust/C.C. Pierce Photography Collection. USC Digital Library. USC Libraries Special Collections. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/search/controller/view/chs-m1275.html?x=1284861262693.

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This entry was posted in Downtown, Los Angeles, Then and now and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to The Hayward Hotel, southwest corner of Sixth and Spring Streets, c. 1910-2010

  1. andre lee says:

    Hey my name is andre lee am looking for a place and was told to come here. Am homeless right now but working and just neef a place to lay down. Can u give me some info on getting a untie with u guys thatnks much

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